Free Shipping on Orders $35+

Login
Amazon American Express Apple Pay Diners Club Discover Meta Pay Google Pay Mastercard PayPal Shop Pay Venmo Visa

This section doesn’t currently include any content. Add content to this section using the sidebar.

Image caption appears here

Add your deal, information or promotional text

Guaranteed to Grow
Easy to Grow
Seed Saver Approved

Garden Sorrel (English or Common Sorrel)

Quick Facts:

  • Also known as Common or English Sorrel
  • Produces mounds of pointed, green leaves
  • Tart flavor adds a punch to mesclun mixes
  • Used for centuries as a garnish or flavoring
  • Perennial to zone 5

View full description

Quantity: Packet (250 Seeds)

Get it between -

We ship to all areas of North America including the United States, its territories and outlying islands, and Canada. International orders may incur an additional charge to cover the handling of customs paperwork. Returns are accepted within 30 days of receipt. Full warranty information can be found here.

Garden Sorrel (English or Common Sorrel)

More about Garden Sorrel

Rumex acetosa

Also known as English Sorrel, Common Sorrel or Large Leaf Sorrel, Garden Sorrel is a perennial plant that produces long, pointed leaves which for centuries have been used as a spring green in salad mixes and as an herb or flavoring for soups and stews.  Leaves have a unique, sour or tart flavor that complements sweet and savory greens and adds an extra punch when used to flavor other dishes.  Like rhubarb, Sorrel's tart flavor is owed to the presence of oxalic acid in the leaves.  While few studies have been conducted to quantify the content of this compound in sorrel, one could assume based on the long history of this plant as a human food source that moderate consumption (as a garnish or seasoning, for ... More

Less

Rumex acetosa

Also known as English Sorrel, Common Sorrel or Large Leaf Sorrel, Garden Sorrel is a perennial plant that produces long, pointed leaves which for centuries have been used as a spring green in salad mixes and as an herb or flavoring for soups and stews.  Leaves have a unique, sour or tart flavor that complements sweet and savory greens and adds an extra punch when used to flavor other dishes.  Like rhubarb, Sorrel's tart flavor is owed to the presence of oxalic acid in the leaves.  While few studies have been conducted to quantify the content of this compound in sorrel, one could assume based on the long history of this plant as a human food source that moderate consumption (as a garnish or seasoning, for example) is likely safe.  Cautious gardeners may wish to parboil the leaves if this is of special concern. Nevertheless, we particularly enjoy the carefree nature of this long-lived perennial plant and appreciate that harvest is as simple as walking outside and snipping a few leaves.  Perennial to zone 5.  Each packet contains a minimum of 250 seeds.

Rumex acetosa

Also known as English Sorrel, Common Sorrel or Large Leaf Sorrel, Garden Sorrel is a perennial plant that produces long, pointed leaves which for centuries have been used as a spring green in salad mixes and as an herb or flavoring for soups and stews.  Leaves have a unique, sour or tart flavor that complements sweet and savory greens and adds an extra punch when used to flavor other dishes.  Like rhubarb, Sorrel's tart flavor is owed to the presence of oxalic... read more

read less

Rumex acetosa

Also known as English Sorrel, Common Sorrel or Large Leaf Sorrel, Garden Sorrel is a perennial plant that produces long, pointed leaves which for centuries have been used as a spring green in salad mixes and as an herb or flavoring for soups and stews.  Leaves have a unique, sour or tart flavor that complements sweet and savory greens and adds an extra punch when used to flavor other dishes.  Like rhubarb, Sorrel's tart flavor is owed to the presence of oxalic acid in the leaves.  While few studies have been conducted to quantify the content of this compound in sorrel, one could assume based on the long history of this plant as a human food source that moderate consumption (as a garnish or seasoning, for example) is likely safe.  Cautious gardeners may wish to parboil the leaves if this is of special concern. Nevertheless, we particularly enjoy the carefree nature of this long-lived perennial plant and appreciate that harvest is as simple as walking outside and snipping a few leaves.  Perennial to zone 5.  Each packet contains a minimum of 250 seeds.

How to Grow Sorrel

Sorrel is a perennial plant that thrives in rich, evenly moist soil with a pH of 5.5-7.5. It works well along the edge of woodlands or in wooded landscapes where it can grow undisturbed and benefit from the rich soil created by leaf mulch. Although it prefers full sun, it does quite well in partial shade, particularly in warmer climates where premature bolting is a concern.

Seeds can be sown indoors several weeks before last frost or can alternatively be direct-sown in midspring. Sow seeds 1/4" deep in prepared beds or pre-moistened seed starting media, if starting indoors. Keep moist until germination has occurred (14-21 days).

Harden off seedlings and transplant outdoors in mid to late spring. Set plants at least 8" apart. If growing as a perennial, be sure to allow ample room for the crowns to expand and spread.

Insect Pests

Diseases & Other Problems

Few problems are known to affect sorrel. Like its relative, rhubarb, sorrel spreads via an expanding network of rhizomes, also known as a crown, which are located beneath the soil below the stem. If crowding becomes a problem, it may become necessary to divide the crowns to give them more growing room.

Sorrel can be harvested during the spring and fall. It can become too strongly flavored in hot temperatures or during flowering. Sorrel will produce additional leaves even after flowering has occurred. Harvest sorrel by clipping entire "plants" just above the crown. Use immediately or store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week.

CONSIDERATIONS:

Saving seeds from sorrel is easy. Flower stalks will appear in mid-summer. Since few distinct cultivars of sorrel are known to exist, cross pollination is usually not a concern.

HARVESTING SEED:

Harvest mature seed stalks when seeds are mostly dry. Place upside down in a paper bag to complete drying. Rub seeds from the stalk or stomp on the stalks to release the seeds. Collect the seeds, winnow if desired, and store in an airtight container in a cool, dark location until ready to use.

SEED LONGETIVITY:

Sorrel seeds will maintain viability for up to 4 years when stored under ideal conditions.

Childs hand planting a seed

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)

Search