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Non-GMO
Neonicotinoid-Free
Heirloom

Knuckle Purple Hull

Quick Facts:

  • Open-pollinated variety ca.1958
  • Heavy yielding, bushy plants
  • Pods held high for easy picking
  • Large, tan to brown, crowder-type peas
  • Popular for freezing, canning and dry storage

View full description

Quantity: Packet (50 Seeds)

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We ship to all areas of North America including the United States, its territories and outlying islands, and Canada. International orders may incur an additional charge to cover the handling of customs paperwork. Returns are accepted within 30 days of receipt. Full warranty information can be found here.

Knuckle Purple Hull

More about Knuckle Purple Hull

Vigna unguiculata

Knuckle Purple Hull is an heirloom variety of crowder pea produced by the Alabama Agricultural Research Station and released in 1958.  Vigorous, bushy plants produce an abundance of mottled purple pods held high above the plants for easy picking.   Pods grow 6 to 9 inches long, enclosing large, tightly packed peas, which gives the pods a knuckle-like appearance as they fill out.  The crowder-type peas have a buff coloring at fresh shell stage and turn brown at maturity.  Knuckle Purple Hull is a popular variety for freezing and also suitable for canning or dry storage.  Extremely heat and drought tolerant.  Harvests begin approximately 65 days after sowing.  Each packet contains a minimum of 50 seeds.... More

Less

Vigna unguiculata

Knuckle Purple Hull is an heirloom variety of crowder pea produced by the Alabama Agricultural Research Station and released in 1958.  Vigorous, bushy plants produce an abundance of mottled purple pods held high above the plants for easy picking.   Pods grow 6 to 9 inches long, enclosing large, tightly packed peas, which gives the pods a knuckle-like appearance as they fill out.  The crowder-type peas have a buff coloring at fresh shell stage and turn brown at maturity.  Knuckle Purple Hull is a popular variety for freezing and also suitable for canning or dry storage.  Extremely heat and drought tolerant.  Harvests begin approximately 65 days after sowing.  Each packet contains a minimum of 50 seeds.

Vigna unguiculata

Knuckle Purple Hull is an heirloom variety of crowder pea produced by the Alabama Agricultural Research Station and released in 1958.  Vigorous, bushy plants produce an abundance of mottled purple pods held high above the plants for easy picking.   Pods grow 6 to 9 inches long, enclosing large, tightly packed peas, which gives the pods a knuckle-like appearance as they fill out.  The crowder-type peas have a buff coloring at fresh shell stage and turn brow... read more

read less

Vigna unguiculata

Knuckle Purple Hull is an heirloom variety of crowder pea produced by the Alabama Agricultural Research Station and released in 1958.  Vigorous, bushy plants produce an abundance of mottled purple pods held high above the plants for easy picking.   Pods grow 6 to 9 inches long, enclosing large, tightly packed peas, which gives the pods a knuckle-like appearance as they fill out.  The crowder-type peas have a buff coloring at fresh shell stage and turn brown at maturity.  Knuckle Purple Hull is a popular variety for freezing and also suitable for canning or dry storage.  Extremely heat and drought tolerant.  Harvests begin approximately 65 days after sowing.  Each packet contains a minimum of 50 seeds.

Child holding beans
Child holding heirloom beans

How to Grow Cowpeas

Cowpeas are a warm-season crop that prefer well-draining soil with a pH between 6.0 and 6.5. They prefer full sun and require at least six hours of sunlight per day for optimal growth. The soil should be kept consistently moist, but not waterlogged, throughout the growing season. Cowpeas are relatively tolerant of drought conditions but may require supplemental watering during prolonged dry spells. Additionally, cowpeas are nitrogen-fixing plants and can benefit from the addition of nitrogen-fixing bacteria to the soil.

After danger of frost has passed, sow seeds 1" deep, 2" apart in rows 36" apart. Provide support for vining varieties. Many non-vining varieties will exhibit some degree of vining if given support.

Not recommended

Insect Pests

Cowpeas are susceptible to various insects, including aphids, thrips, leafhoppers, and bean beetles, which can cause significant damage to the plants. Using insecticidal soap or neem oil can help control insect infestations, while using disease-resistant cultivars and rotating crops can reduce the risk of disease.

Diseases & Other Problems

Diseases such as root rot, bacterial blight, and powdery mildew can occasionally affect cowpeas, especially in warm and humid conditions. To prevent these issues, it is important to maintain good garden hygiene, avoid overcrowding, and provide adequate air circulation.

Cowpeas are typically ready to harvest 70 to 90 days after planting, depending on the variety and growing conditions. The pods should be firm and plump and should snap easily when bent. The ideal time to harvest cowpeas is when the pods are still green and tender, before they become too tough and fibrous. To harvest, simply pick the pods from the plant by hand or use scissors or pruning shears. Cowpeas can be eaten fresh or dried for later use. If harvesting for dry beans, wait until the pods have turned brown and dry on the vine before harvesting.

CONSIDERATIONS:

Cowpeas are typically self-pollinating and do not require isolation. However, to prevent rare cases of cross-pollination, plant different cowpea varieties 20 feet apart or stagger planting times. Use physical barriers to isolate plants for seed-saving purposes or in areas with high cross-pollination risk.

HARVESTING SEED:

To save seeds from cowpeas, allow the pods to dry on the vine until they are brown and crispy. Remove the pods from the plant and break them open to reveal the seeds. Separate the seeds from the pod debris and spread them out in a single layer on a tray or screen to dry completely. Once the seeds are dry, store them in an airtight container in a cool, dry place until you are ready to plant them the following season.

SEED LONGETIVITY:

Cowpea seeds can maintain viability for up to 3 to 5 years if stored properly in a cool, dry, and dark place.

Girl holding cowpeas

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