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Guaranteed to Grow
Neonicotinoid-Free
Seed Saver Approved

Luffa (Loofah) Dishcloth Gourd

Quick Facts:

  • Heirloom gourd variety used for dishcloths
  • Grow to 30' long, yields long green fruit
  • Peel mature gourds to reveal golden interiors
  • Can be started indoors
  • 130 days to harvest

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Quantity: Packet (25 Seeds)

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We ship to all areas of North America including the United States, its territories and outlying islands, and Canada. International orders may incur an additional charge to cover the handling of customs paperwork. Returns are accepted within 30 days of receipt. Full warranty information can be found here.

Luffa (Loofah) Dishcloth Gourd

More about Luffa Dishcloth

Luffa aegyptiaca

Also known as "Loofah" Gourd, Luffa Dishcloth Gourd is an heirloom variety traditionally used to make natural dishcloths, scouring pads and bath scrubbers.  Vigorous vining plants grow up to thirty feet long, producing amazing yields of long green fruit.  Once fully mature gourds are dried and cured, shells can be removed to reveal golden, webbed interiors.  Plants require a long growing season to reach full maturity, however loofah seeds can be started indoors or grown in a hot bed to lengthen the growing season. 130 days to harvest.  Each packet contains a minimum of 25 seeds.

Luffa aegyptiaca

Also known as "Loofah" Gourd, Luffa Dishcloth Gourd is an heirloom variety traditionally used to make natural dishcloths, scouring pads and bath scrubbers.  Vigorous vining plants grow up to thirty feet long, producing amazing yields of long green fruit.  Once fully mature gourds are dried and cured, shells can be removed to reveal golden, webbed interiors.  Plants require a long growing season to reach full maturity, however loofah seeds can be started ind... read more

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Luffa aegyptiaca

Also known as "Loofah" Gourd, Luffa Dishcloth Gourd is an heirloom variety traditionally used to make natural dishcloths, scouring pads and bath scrubbers.  Vigorous vining plants grow up to thirty feet long, producing amazing yields of long green fruit.  Once fully mature gourds are dried and cured, shells can be removed to reveal golden, webbed interiors.  Plants require a long growing season to reach full maturity, however loofah seeds can be started indoors or grown in a hot bed to lengthen the growing season. 130 days to harvest.  Each packet contains a minimum of 25 seeds.

Little Girl planting seeds
Little girl planting seeds

How to Grow Gourds

Gourds prefer well-draining soil with a pH between 6.0-7.0. and full sun exposure for at least 6-8 hours a day. The soil should be rich in organic matter and watered regularly, but not waterlogged. Gourds are also heavy feeders and benefit from regular fertilization with balanced or nitrogen-rich fertilizers. Growing gourds on a trellis can improve circulation and reduce soil contact of the fruit, both of which can reduce disease prevalence, however vines grown in this manner will require more frequent watering.

After danger of frost has passed, sow seeds in hills with 4-5 seeds per hill and hills spaced 6ft in all directions.  Germination will occur in 7-14 days.  Once seeds have germinated, thin to 3 seedlings per hill.  In short season climates, plants can be started indoors and transplanted after danger of frost has passed. 

Prepare the soil by loosening it and incorporating organic matter. Dig a hole slightly larger than the root ball of the gourd seedling. Carefully remove the seedling from its container, being careful not to damage the fragile roots. Place the seedling in the hole and fill in with soil, firming it gently around the base of the plant. Water the seedling thoroughly to help settle the soil and remove any air pockets.

Insect Pests

Common insect pests that can affect gourds include squash bugs, cucumber beetles, and vine borers. Squash bugs can cause wilting and yellowing of leaves, while cucumber beetles can transmit diseases and cause damage to the fruit. Vine borers can bore into the stems of the gourd plant, causing wilting and death of the plant. Regular inspection and management, including cultural practices such as crop rotation and the use of physical barriers, as well as the use of insecticides when necessary, can help control these pests and prevent damage to the gourd crop.

Diseases & Other Problems

Gourds can be susceptible to various diseases such as powdery mildew, downy mildew, and bacterial wilt, which can cause stunted growth, wilting, and reduced yield. Other problems that can affect gourds include poor pollination, which can result in misshapen or poorly developed fruit, and fruit rot, which can occur due to fungal infections or damage to the fruit. To prevent these problems, it is important to provide proper care, including regular watering and fertilization, as well as sanitation practices such as removing diseased plant material and properly disposing of it.

To harvest gourds, wait until the stem has turned brown and the fruit has reached its full size and color. Cut the stem carefully, leaving at least an inch attached to the fruit. Clean the gourd with a solution of 10% bleach and water to remove any dirt or bacteria. Allow the gourd to dry for 1-2 weeks in a well-ventilated, dry area, turning it occasionally to promote even drying. Once the gourd is fully dry, it can be stored in a cool, dry place for up to 6 months. If the gourd is not fully mature or has any damage or soft spots, it is best to discard it as it may not dry properly or may be more prone to rot. Proper harvesting and storage practices are crucial for maintaining the quality and longevity of the gourd crop.

CONSIDERATIONS:

Gourds are outcrossing plants with pollination being performed predominantly by bees and other insects. Therefore plants to be used for seed production should be isolated from other varieties of the same species by at least one-quarter mile.

HARVESTING SEED:

To save seeds from gourds, allow the fruit to fully mature and dry on the vine until the skin has turned brown and the fruit feels lightweight and hollow. Cut the gourd open and remove the seeds, being careful to separate them from the pulp and other plant material. Rinse the seeds in a strainer to remove any remaining pulp and spread them out on a paper towel or screen to dry completely. Once the seeds are fully dry, store them in an airtight container in a cool, dry place.

SEED LONGETIVITY:

Gourd seeds can maintain 50% viability for up to 6 years under proper storage conditions.

Tennessee Spinning Gourd

Customer Reviews

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Barbara McFarland

Great germination rate and I’m excited to add them to my garden this year

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