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Guaranteed to Grow
Neonicotinoid-Free
Seed Saver Approved

Champion Heirloom Collard Greens

Quick Facts:

  • Vates-type selected for bolting resistance
  • Large, dark green leaves with mild flavor
  • Adapted to many climates
  • Plant in fall for best results
  • Popular vegetable in many cuisines

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Quantity: Packet (100 Seeds)

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We ship to all areas of North America including the United States, its territories and outlying islands, and Canada. International orders may incur an additional charge to cover the handling of customs paperwork. Returns are accepted within 30 days of receipt. Full warranty information can be found here.

Champion Heirloom Collard Greens

More about Champion

Brassica Oleracea

Champion is an heirloom, Vates-type collard selected for its resistance to springtime bolting when planted in the fall.  Plants produce large, dark green leaves with a mild cabbage-like flavor.  Champion collard greens are widely adapted to a variety of climates and are suitable for both spring and fall planting.  Each packet contains a minimum of 100 seeds.

Brassica Oleracea

Champion is an heirloom, Vates-type collard selected for its resistance to springtime bolting when planted in the fall.  Plants produce large, dark green leaves with a mild cabbage-like flavor.  Champion collard greens are widely adapted to a variety of climates and are suitable for both spring and fall planting.  Each packet contains a minimum of 100 seeds.

Bucket of heirloom beans
Bucket of heirloom beans

How to Grow Collards

Collards grow best in well-drained, fertile soil that is rich in organic matter. They prefer a slightly acidic soil pH between 6.0 and 7.0. Collards require full sun to grow and develop properly, although they can tolerate some shade. In areas with hot summers, collards benefit from some afternoon shade to prevent stress and wilting. In general, collards prefer cool temperatures, and they grow best when daytime temperatures range from 60 to 70°F and nighttime temperatures range from 40 to 50°F. They can be grown in both spring and fall, and they perform well in cooler climates with a long growing season. Proper soil preparation and regular watering are important for producing healthy and productive collard plants.

To sow collard seeds, fill seed starting trays or containers with a sterile seed starting mix. Sow the seeds about 1/4 inch deep and 2-3 inches apart. Water the soil gently to ensure good seed-to-soil contact. Cover the containers with plastic wrap or a clear plastic dome to create a greenhouse effect and keep the soil moist. Place the containers in a warm, bright location, such as a sunny windowsill or under grow lights. Once the seedlings have emerged, remove the plastic covering and keep the soil consistently moist. When the seedlings have at least two sets of true leaves, they are ready to be transplanted into the garden.

To transplant collards, wait until the seedlings are 4-6 weeks old and have at least two sets of true leaves. Dig holes in the prepared soil about 18 inches apart and deep enough to accommodate the root balls of the seedlings. Gently remove the seedlings from their containers, being careful not to damage the roots, and place them in the holes. Backfill the holes with soil and water the plants thoroughly. Keep the soil moist but not waterlogged and provide shade as needed for the first few days to prevent transplant shock.

Insect Pests

Very young direct-seeded plants are susceptible to flea beetles. Otherwise, the predominant threat to collards is the cabbage moth caterpillar. Floating row covers and biological controls like Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are very effective at controlling caterpillar damage.

Diseases & Other Problems

Collards can be affected by several diseases, including black rot, downy mildew, and clubroot. Black rot is a bacterial disease that causes yellowing and wilting of the leaves, and can eventually kill the plant. Downy mildew is a fungal disease that causes yellowing and curling of the leaves, and can also affect the growth of the plant. Clubroot is a soil-borne disease that can cause stunted growth and distorted roots. Proper soil drainage and crop rotation can help prevent the development of these diseases. It's also important to remove and destroy any infected plant debris to prevent the spread of disease.

Collards can be harvested by cutting off the outer leaves from the bottom of the plant and working your way up. The leaves can be harvested when they are large enough to use, but before they become tough and bitter. Collards can be stored for several weeks in the refrigerator, but they are best used fresh. To store collards, wrap them in a damp paper towel and place them in a plastic bag, or store them in an airtight container.

CONSIDERATIONS:

As collards are outcrossing plants, it is necessary isolate the plants in order to prevent cross-pollination with other related plants such as cauliflower, cabbage, and kale. Cross-pollination can result in undesirable traits in the offspring, affecting their taste, texture, and appearance. To prevent cross-pollination, you can either plant different crops in separate areas or use physical barriers such as nets or cages to protect the plants (pollinators will need to be introduced in this scenario). Collards are also biennial plants that require a vernalization, or cooling period, to initiate flowering. Therefore plants must be dug and brought indoors in climates with harsh winters. Once replanted in the spring, plants will begin to develop flowers that eventually give way to siliques, the seed bearing structures of the oleracea plants.

HARVESTING SEED:

To harvest collard seeds, allow the plant to fully mature and form seed pods. The seed pods will turn brown and dry when they are ready for harvesting. Cut the seed stalks from the plant and place them in a dry and well-ventilated area for further drying, until the pods split open and release the seeds. Once the seeds are fully dried, separate them from the pods and store them in a cool and dry place until you are ready to plant them.

SEED LONGETIVITY:

Collard seeds can maintain their viability for up to 5 years if they are stored properly. It's important to store the seeds in a cool, dry place to prevent them from being exposed to moisture or extreme temperatures.

Girl holding basket of collard greens

Customer Reviews

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Sharon M. Coker
Late Starting

Starting late getting my seedlings started had a death in my family. Will get back with you when my seedlings are ready to plant outside

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