Free Shipping on Orders $35+

Login
Amazon American Express Apple Pay Diners Club Discover Meta Pay Google Pay Mastercard PayPal Shop Pay Venmo Visa

This section doesn’t currently include any content. Add content to this section using the sidebar.

Image caption appears here

Add your deal, information or promotional text

Guaranteed to Grow
Neonicotinoid-Free
Heirloom

New Zealand Spinach

Quick Facts:

  • Discovered by Sir Joseph Banks
  • A heat-tolerant alternative to spinach
  • Green leaves can be eaten raw or cooked
  • Low-growing, sprawling habit
  • Produces edible leaves in 55 days

View full description

Quantity: Packet (50 Seeds)

Get it between -

We ship to all areas of North America including the United States, its territories and outlying islands, and Canada. International orders may incur an additional charge to cover the handling of customs paperwork. Returns are accepted within 30 days of receipt. Full warranty information can be found here.

New Zealand Spinach

More about New Zealand Spinach

Tetragonia tetragonoides

New Zealand Spinach is a unique, edible green reportedly discovered by botanist Sir Joseph Banks while on the expedition of the South Pacific led by Captain Cook (1768-1771).  Subsequently released to English gardeners and widely adopted as a heat-tolerant alternative to common spinach.  Although not a true spinach, the leaves have a similar flavor and like spinach, can be eaten raw or cooked.  Plants have a low-growing, sprawling habit and will fill out whatever space you give them.  Produces edible leaves roughly 55 days from planting, with harvests continuing until frost.  Can be grown as a perennial in frost-free climates.  Harvests begin 50-60 days after sowing.  Each packet contains a min... More

Less

Tetragonia tetragonoides

New Zealand Spinach is a unique, edible green reportedly discovered by botanist Sir Joseph Banks while on the expedition of the South Pacific led by Captain Cook (1768-1771).  Subsequently released to English gardeners and widely adopted as a heat-tolerant alternative to common spinach.  Although not a true spinach, the leaves have a similar flavor and like spinach, can be eaten raw or cooked.  Plants have a low-growing, sprawling habit and will fill out whatever space you give them.  Produces edible leaves roughly 55 days from planting, with harvests continuing until frost.  Can be grown as a perennial in frost-free climates.  Harvests begin 50-60 days after sowing.  Each packet contains a minimum of 50 seeds.

Tetragonia tetragonoides

New Zealand Spinach is a unique, edible green reportedly discovered by botanist Sir Joseph Banks while on the expedition of the South Pacific led by Captain Cook (1768-1771).  Subsequently released to English gardeners and widely adopted as a heat-tolerant alternative to common spinach.  Although not a true spinach, the leaves have a similar flavor and like spinach, can be eaten raw or cooked.  Plants have a low-growing, sprawling habit and will fil... read more

read less

Tetragonia tetragonoides

New Zealand Spinach is a unique, edible green reportedly discovered by botanist Sir Joseph Banks while on the expedition of the South Pacific led by Captain Cook (1768-1771).  Subsequently released to English gardeners and widely adopted as a heat-tolerant alternative to common spinach.  Although not a true spinach, the leaves have a similar flavor and like spinach, can be eaten raw or cooked.  Plants have a low-growing, sprawling habit and will fill out whatever space you give them.  Produces edible leaves roughly 55 days from planting, with harvests continuing until frost.  Can be grown as a perennial in frost-free climates.  Harvests begin 50-60 days after sowing.  Each packet contains a minimum of 50 seeds.

Boy holding slice of watermelon
Kids eating watermelon

How to Grow New Zealand Spinach

New Zealand Spinach prefers a well-draining soil with a pH of 6.5-7.0, and plenty of sunlight. It does best in full sun, but can tolerate some shade. It needs regular watering and should be fertilized every few weeks with a fertilizer that is heavy in nitrogen.

Sow seeds outdoors after danger of frost has passed.  Soak seeds overnight and sow 1/2" deep, 6" apart in rows 3-4' apart.  Can also be started indoors 3-4 weeks before the last frost.

Harden off seedlings for a few days prior to transplanting. After danger of frost has passed, dig a hole roughly the size of the root ball and lower the seedling in, being careful not to disturb the roots. Backfill with loose soil and water well. Space plants 6" apart in rows 3-4' apart. Keep well-watered until the plants are established.

Insect Pests

New Zealand spinach is not commonly affected by insect pests.

Diseases & Other Problems

New Zealand Spinach is seldom affected by disease. It is, however, a heavy feeder and requires ample amounts of nitrogen throughout the growing season. Nutrient deficiencies can cause plants to bolt prematurely which will lead to a bitter flavor.

Individual leaves can be harvested at any time, but avoid harvesting too many until the plant is well-established. Be careful not to damage leaves during harvest as they will spoil more quickly. Leaves can be stored in the fridge for 2-5 days, preferably in a sealed container or bag with a damp paper towel.

CONSIDERATIONS:

New Zealand Spinach is an inbreeding plant with perfect flowers that are fertilize via self-pollination. No isolation is required when growing more than one variety. New Zealand spinach will not cross with conventional spinach or Malabar Spinach.

HARVESTING SEED:

New Zealand spinach fruit are borne along the stem and mature progressively from the base of the plant upwards. Harvest the mature brown fruit before they fall to the ground or alternatively, harvest green fruit and allow them to mature indoors. Crush gently to release the seeds and store in an airtight container until ready to use.

SEED LONGETIVITY:

New Zealand Spinach seeds can remain viable for up to five years if stored in a cool, dry place.

Dirty hands in the garden

Customer Reviews

No reviews yet
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)

Search