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Hayes White Sweet Corn Seeds

Hayes White Sweet Corn

$ 3.99

Sweet kernels nearly melt in your mouth

  • Very rare sweet corn variety
  • Exceptionally tender kernels
  • Flavor rivals that of modern hybrids
  • Produces 2 ears per plant
  • Short statured, early maturing plants

MORE ABOUT HAYES WHITE SWEET CORN:

(Zea mays) If you are looking for an heirloom sweet corn with modern sweet corn quality, look no further.  Developed by Dr. H.K. Hayes of Minnesota State University in the 1930's.  According to Dr. Hayes, seed from a "very tender, white endosperm, open-pollinated variety of unknown origin" was obtained from his brother H.M. Hayes, of Granby, CT who had been growing it for many years.  Dr. Hayes continued to select for tenderness by testing with a penetrometer at 20 days after pollination and saving the ears with the most tender kernels.  The resulting line required 40% less pressure to puncture the kernels, when compared to Golden Bantam, and was the basis for the breeding of many subsequent sweet corn varieties, including the famous "Silver Queen" hybrid.  Early-maturing plants grow just 3-4' tall, making them an excellent choice for small gardens.  Plants produce two harvestable ears per plant.  60-75 days to harvest.  50 seeds per packet.

HISTORY OF HAYES WHITE SWEET CORN:

Learn more about Dr. Hayes and his famous sweet corn from longtime corn breeder, Forrest Troyer:

"[I] first met Dr. Hayes in the summer of 1956 on University Farm while harvesting sweet corn ears. “You should try some of this smaller, early variety,” he said. “I’m not particular about sweet corn.” I replied. “I like it all.” To which he proclaimed; “I AM PARTICULAR ABOUT SWEET CORN, and this small early variety is better quality than what you are harvesting.” Of course it was. It was Hayes White that had been improved for pericarp (female tissue enveloping the kernel) tenderness at Minnesota by selection with a penetrometer 20 days after pollination while the ears were still attached to the plant. Tougher ears were harvested to eat; the more tender ears were left on the plant to mature and be harvested for planting next year, when the procedure was repeated. Hayes White sweet corn kernels nearly melt in your mouth."

GROWING INFORMATION:

CULTURE: Corn performs best in soil that is well-drained, but also able to hold onto some moisture, as corn tends to use quite a bit of water during its active growth phase. Working in a healthy dose of well-composted manure in the fall will ensure that the rapidly growing plants receive adequate water and nutrition.

SOWING: After danger of frost has passed and soil temps have reached 55 degrees, sow seeds 9-12" apart, 1" deep, in rows 24-36" apart. To maximize pollination, use a paired row or square plot configuration. Under ideal conditions, germination will occur in 7-10 days.

INSECT PESTS: Biological controls such as Bacillus thuringiensis can be effective in controlling common corn pests like corn borer and earworm. Aphids, Japanese beetles, and other hard-shelled insects can be controlled with a simple homemade insecticidal soap solution.

DISEASES AND PROBLEMS: Corn is susceptible to a number of plant diseases. Consult your local extension office to learn which diseases are most prevalent in your region. Crop rotation, tillage, and removal of plant debris are all effective tools in managing common corn diseases.

HARVEST AND STORAGE: Harvest sweet corn ears approximately 20 days after pollination or once the silks tips have mostly dried.  Use immediately or refrigerate until needed.  Ears for seed saving can be harvested once the husks have dried and the kernels have sufficiently hardened. 

SAVING SEEDS: To maintain genetic diversity, save seed from at least 50 to 100 plants. If open-pollinated, plants should be isolated from other corn varieties by at least 1/4 mile. Otherwise, hand-pollination can be performed.

Sweet kernels nearly melt in your mouth

  • Very rare sweet corn variety
  • Exceptionally tender kernels
  • Flavor rivals that of modern hybrids
  • Produces 2 ears per plant
  • Short statured, early maturing plants

MORE ABOUT HAYES WHITE SWEET CORN:

(Zea mays) If you are looking for an heirloom sweet corn with modern sweet corn quality, look no further.  Developed by Dr. H.K. Hayes of Minnesota State University in the 1930's.  According to Dr. Hayes, seed from a "very tender, white endosperm, open-pollinated variety of unknown origin" was obtained from his brother H.M. Hayes, of Granby, CT who had been growing it for many years.  Dr. Hayes continued to select for tenderness by testing with a penetrometer at 20 days after pollination and saving the ears with the most tender kernels.  The resulting line required 40% less pressure to puncture the kernels, when compared to Golden Bantam, and was the basis for the breeding of many subsequent sweet corn varieties, including the famous "Silver Queen" hybrid.  Early-maturing plants grow just 3-4' tall, making them an excellent choice for small gardens.  Plants produce two harvestable ears per plant.  60-75 days to harvest.  50 seeds per packet.

HISTORY OF HAYES WHITE SWEET CORN:

Learn more about Dr. Hayes and his famous sweet corn from longtime corn breeder, Forrest Troyer:

"[I] first met Dr. Hayes in the summer of 1956 on University Farm while harvesting sweet corn ears. “You should try some of this smaller, early variety,” he said. “I’m not particular about sweet corn.” I replied. “I like it all.” To which he proclaimed; “I AM PARTICULAR ABOUT SWEET CORN, and this small early variety is better quality than what you are harvesting.” Of course it was. It was Hayes White that had been improved for pericarp (female tissue enveloping the kernel) tenderness at Minnesota by selection with a penetrometer 20 days after pollination while the ears were still attached to the plant. Tougher ears were harvested to eat; the more tender ears were left on the plant to mature and be harvested for planting next year, when the procedure was repeated. Hayes White sweet corn kernels nearly melt in your mouth."

GROWING INFORMATION:

CULTURE: Corn performs best in soil that is well-drained, but also able to hold onto some moisture, as corn tends to use quite a bit of water during its active growth phase. Working in a healthy dose of well-composted manure in the fall will ensure that the rapidly growing plants receive adequate water and nutrition.

SOWING: After danger of frost has passed and soil temps have reached 55 degrees, sow seeds 9-12" apart, 1" deep, in rows 24-36" apart. To maximize pollination, use a paired row or square plot configuration. Under ideal conditions, germination will occur in 7-10 days.

INSECT PESTS: Biological controls such as Bacillus thuringiensis can be effective in controlling common corn pests like corn borer and earworm. Aphids, Japanese beetles, and other hard-shelled insects can be controlled with a simple homemade insecticidal soap solution.

DISEASES AND PROBLEMS: Corn is susceptible to a number of plant diseases. Consult your local extension office to learn which diseases are most prevalent in your region. Crop rotation, tillage, and removal of plant debris are all effective tools in managing common corn diseases.

HARVEST AND STORAGE: Harvest sweet corn ears approximately 20 days after pollination or once the silks tips have mostly dried.  Use immediately or refrigerate until needed.  Ears for seed saving can be harvested once the husks have dried and the kernels have sufficiently hardened. 

SAVING SEEDS: To maintain genetic diversity, save seed from at least 50 to 100 plants. If open-pollinated, plants should be isolated from other corn varieties by at least 1/4 mile. Otherwise, hand-pollination can be performed.

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