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Copenhagen Market Cabbage Seeds

Copenhagen Market Cabbage

100 Seeds

$ 2.99

(Brassica oleracea) Historic Danish cabbage variety first introduced by H. Hartmann & Company in 1909. Plants produce round, crack-resistant heads averaging 3-4lbs each. An excellent early variety for spring planting. Refreshing, crisp and sweet—one of the best cabbage varieties for coleslaw. 63-100 days from transplant. Approx. 100 seeds per packet.

GROWING INFORMATION:

CULTURE: All cabbages are heavy feeders and thus prefer rich, fertile soil with ample amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and boron. Cabbage has a shallow, dense root system that makes it prone to moisture fluctuations and damage by cultivation. For best results, mulch plants with straw, newspaper or other natural materials. Cabbage prefers full sun, but can tolerate some light shade, especially in very warm climates.

SOWING: Start seed indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost. Sow seeds 1/4" deep in sterile seed starting media. Germination will occur in approximately 5 days. Fall cabbages can be started indoors approximately 3 months before last frost or direct seeded in mid-summer. Floating row covers are recommended to protect late-planted seedlings from flea beetles.

TRANSPLANTING:  Set plants outdoors 4-5 weeks before last frost and after plants have put out at least three true leaves. Space transplants 18-24" apart in all directions. Be careful not to disturb the root ball. Water well and mulch with straw, newspaper, or grass clippings.

INSECT PESTS: Very young direct-seeded plants are susceptible to flea beetles. Otherwise, the predominant threat to cabbages is the cabbage moth caterpillar. Floating row covers and biological controls like Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are very effective at controlling caterpillar damage.

DISEASES AND OTHER PROBLEMS: The shallow root system of cabbage makes it very susceptible to fluctuations in soil moisture and damage by cultivation. Mulch plants to prevent weed growth and maintain consistent moisture. If weeds become a problem, pulling is preferable to hoeing. Splitting of mature or nearly mature heads is a common issue caused by fluctuations in moisture and heads that have grown too large. To slow the growth of a mature cabbage and thus prevent splitting, pull or twist the plant slightly to break roots or sever some of the roots by inserting a shovel on one side of the plant.

HARVEST AND STORAGE: Cabbages can be harvested at any time once the heads reach ample size. For fresh eating or short term storage: Using a sharp knife, cut the heads at the stem. If storing in the fridge, leave as many of the wrapped leaves intact as possible and do not wash until use. For winter storage of fall cabbages, select solid, disease-free cabbages with tightly wrapped leaves. Inspect for cracks as damaged heads will not keep. Harvest by pulling plants up by the roots, being careful not to damage the head. Trim off any loose leaves. Store in a root cellar or other cool, well-ventilated place. The ideal conditions for cabbage storage are 32-40 degrees Fahrenheit and 90% humidity.

SAVING SEED: Cabbages are biennials and require an extended vernalization period for seed production. In temperate climates, cabbages grown for seed can be planted in mid-summer and left to overwinter in the field. In colder climates, mature cabbages must be dug in the fall and stored indoors using the long-term method described above. Plants can then be planted outdoors in the spring. To facilitate the emergence of the seed head, an "x" should be cut in the head once plants have re-established themselves in the spring. All cole crops (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, collards, kale, and kohlrabi) belong to the same species and cross-pollinate readily. Therefore, care should be taken to isolate the seed crop from potential pollen contaminates. A distance of 1 mile is usually adequate.

(Brassica oleracea) Historic Danish cabbage variety first introduced by H. Hartmann & Company in 1909. Plants produce round, crack-resistant heads averaging 3-4lbs each. An excellent early variety for spring planting. Refreshing, crisp and sweet—one of the best cabbage varieties for coleslaw. 63-100 days from transplant. Approx. 100 seeds per packet.

GROWING INFORMATION:

CULTURE: All cabbages are heavy feeders and thus prefer rich, fertile soil with ample amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and boron. Cabbage has a shallow, dense root system that makes it prone to moisture fluctuations and damage by cultivation. For best results, mulch plants with straw, newspaper or other natural materials. Cabbage prefers full sun, but can tolerate some light shade, especially in very warm climates.

SOWING: Start seed indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost. Sow seeds 1/4" deep in sterile seed starting media. Germination will occur in approximately 5 days. Fall cabbages can be started indoors approximately 3 months before last frost or direct seeded in mid-summer. Floating row covers are recommended to protect late-planted seedlings from flea beetles.

TRANSPLANTING:  Set plants outdoors 4-5 weeks before last frost and after plants have put out at least three true leaves. Space transplants 18-24" apart in all directions. Be careful not to disturb the root ball. Water well and mulch with straw, newspaper, or grass clippings.

INSECT PESTS: Very young direct-seeded plants are susceptible to flea beetles. Otherwise, the predominant threat to cabbages is the cabbage moth caterpillar. Floating row covers and biological controls like Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are very effective at controlling caterpillar damage.

DISEASES AND OTHER PROBLEMS: The shallow root system of cabbage makes it very susceptible to fluctuations in soil moisture and damage by cultivation. Mulch plants to prevent weed growth and maintain consistent moisture. If weeds become a problem, pulling is preferable to hoeing. Splitting of mature or nearly mature heads is a common issue caused by fluctuations in moisture and heads that have grown too large. To slow the growth of a mature cabbage and thus prevent splitting, pull or twist the plant slightly to break roots or sever some of the roots by inserting a shovel on one side of the plant.

HARVEST AND STORAGE: Cabbages can be harvested at any time once the heads reach ample size. For fresh eating or short term storage: Using a sharp knife, cut the heads at the stem. If storing in the fridge, leave as many of the wrapped leaves intact as possible and do not wash until use. For winter storage of fall cabbages, select solid, disease-free cabbages with tightly wrapped leaves. Inspect for cracks as damaged heads will not keep. Harvest by pulling plants up by the roots, being careful not to damage the head. Trim off any loose leaves. Store in a root cellar or other cool, well-ventilated place. The ideal conditions for cabbage storage are 32-40 degrees Fahrenheit and 90% humidity.

SAVING SEED: Cabbages are biennials and require an extended vernalization period for seed production. In temperate climates, cabbages grown for seed can be planted in mid-summer and left to overwinter in the field. In colder climates, mature cabbages must be dug in the fall and stored indoors using the long-term method described above. Plants can then be planted outdoors in the spring. To facilitate the emergence of the seed head, an "x" should be cut in the head once plants have re-established themselves in the spring. All cole crops (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, collards, kale, and kohlrabi) belong to the same species and cross-pollinate readily. Therefore, care should be taken to isolate the seed crop from potential pollen contaminates. A distance of 1 mile is usually adequate.

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