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Non-GMO
Easy to Grow
Heirloom

Boone County White Corn

Quick Facts:

  • Heirloom corn variety dating back to 1874
  • Large ears reach up to 11" long
  • Wide ears; 18-22 rows around
  • Ivory kernels great for grinding/roasting
  • Tall plants with excellent standability

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Quantity: Packet (50 Seeds)

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We ship to all areas of North America including the United States, its territories and outlying islands, and Canada. International orders may incur an additional charge to cover the handling of customs paperwork. Returns are accepted within 30 days of receipt. Full warranty information can be found here.

Boone County White Corn

More about Boone County White

Zea mays

White seeded variety developed by James Riley of Boone County, Indiana and released in 1874.  Towering plants with wide leaves produce large 18-22 rowed ears of up to 11” in length.  Plants have excellent standability.  Following the 2020 derecho that blew through our area, we were surprised to find that the Boone Co. White had escaped the 100+ mph winds mostly unscathed, despite the fact that it towered far above our other varieties. Large, white kernels are suitable for roasting or grinding into corn flour. 115 days.  50 seeds per packet.

Zea mays

White seeded variety developed by James Riley of Boone County, Indiana and released in 1874.  Towering plants with wide leaves produce large 18-22 rowed ears of up to 11” in length.  Plants have excellent standability.  Following the 2020 derecho that blew through our area, we were surprised to find that the Boone Co. White had escaped the 100+ mph winds mostly unscathed, despite the fact that it towered far above our other varieties. Large, white kernels are suita... read more

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Zea mays

White seeded variety developed by James Riley of Boone County, Indiana and released in 1874.  Towering plants with wide leaves produce large 18-22 rowed ears of up to 11” in length.  Plants have excellent standability.  Following the 2020 derecho that blew through our area, we were surprised to find that the Boone Co. White had escaped the 100+ mph winds mostly unscathed, despite the fact that it towered far above our other varieties. Large, white kernels are suitable for roasting or grinding into corn flour. 115 days.  50 seeds per packet.

Bucket of heirloom beans
Bucket of heirloom beans

How to Grow Corn

Corn performs best in soil that is well-drained, but also able to hold onto some moisture, as corn tends to use quite a bit of water during its active growth phase.  Working in a healthy dose of well-composted manure in the fall will ensure that the rapidly growing plants receive adequate water and nutrition. 

After danger of frost has passed and soil temps have reached 55 degrees, sow seeds 9-12" apart, 1" deep, in rows 24-36" apart.  To maximize pollination use a paired row or square plot configuration.  Under ideal conditions, germination will occur in 7-10 days.

Not recommended

Insect Pests

Biological controls such as Bacillus thuringiensis can be effecting in controlling common corn pests like corn borer and earworm.  Aphids, Japanese beetles, and other hard-shelled insects can be controlled with a simple homemade insecticidal soap solution.

Diseases & Other Problems

Corn is susceptible to a number of plant diseases.  Consult your local extension office to learn which diseases are most prevalent in your region. Crop rotation, tillage, and removal of plant debris are all effective tools in managing common corn diseases.

Sweet corn is ready to harvest approximately 21 days after pollination. At peak, the kernel tips should be rounded and glossy. Shelling corn can be harvested once the husks have dried and the kernels have sufficiently hardened.  To test for maturity, pull back the husk and remove a kernel from the ear.  If the tip at the base of the kernel breaks off to reveal a brown "abscission" layer, the ears are ready to harvest.

CONSIDERATIONS:

To maintain genetic diversity, save seed from at least 50 to 100 plants.  If open-pollinated, plants should be isolated from other corn varieties by at least 1/4 mile.  Otherwise, hand-pollination can be performed.

HARVESTING SEED:

Wait until ears have reached full maturity and the kernels cannot be pierced by your fingernail. Peel back the husk and harvest the ear by pulling down and twisting. Place in a mesh bag or basket and allow to continue to dry for two weeks. Shell ears using a manual corn shelling tool or tightly grip a gloved hand around the ear and twist to separate the kernels from the cob. Winnow to remove any chaff and store in an airtight container until ready to use.

SEED LONGETIVITY:

Corn seeds will maintain 50% viability for three years when stored in a cool, dark place.

Hand pollinating corn

Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
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C
Christoffer Abrahamsson
Amazing corn that will impress neighbors

I grew fifty of these Boone county corn plants in Massachusetts in 2023. These plants did fantastically with many of them growing 12 feet tall and producing large ears (1-2 per plant, mostly 1). It probably helped that the plants had access to a three inch thick layer of compost. I also tied them up to reduce the risk of them falling over, The neighbors were impressed by these tall plants! If harvested early the ears were good as sweet corn, but when harvested later this corn produced good flour, grits, and polenta. The polenta was especially good with delicate tones of of sweet corn that I normally do not get with flour corn.

J
Jan Rousey

They are just coming up. Looking good though.

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