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Heirloom

Texas Tiny Cherry Tomato

Quick Facts:

  • Extremely productive cherry tomato
  • Vines reach 15 feet or more
  • 1000’s of tomatoes over a single season
  • The most flavorful tomato we've tried
  • Great for snacking and salads

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Quantity: Packet (50 Seeds)

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We ship to all areas of North America including the United States, its territories and outlying islands, and Canada. International orders may incur an additional charge to cover the handling of customs paperwork. Returns are accepted within 30 days of receipt. Full warranty information can be found here.

Texas Tiny Cherry Tomato

More about Texas Tiny

Solanum lycopersicum

While the history of Texas Tiny remains elusive (see below), we couldn't have more good things to say about this tiny but mighty cherry tomato.  First of all, it is important to note that the "tiny" refers to the size of the tomatoes, not the plant, as we learned the hard way many years ago.  The plants themselves have a sprawling habit, reaching 15 feet or more if you don't prune them.  They are incredibly high yielding, initiating their first tomatoes as seedlings, usually while still indoors, and continuing until the first frost.  A single plant will bear thousands upon thousands of tomatoes over a typical growing season and consequently, we've concluded that it is not possible to keep them pick... More

Less

Solanum lycopersicum

While the history of Texas Tiny remains elusive (see below), we couldn't have more good things to say about this tiny but mighty cherry tomato.  First of all, it is important to note that the "tiny" refers to the size of the tomatoes, not the plant, as we learned the hard way many years ago.  The plants themselves have a sprawling habit, reaching 15 feet or more if you don't prune them.  They are incredibly high yielding, initiating their first tomatoes as seedlings, usually while still indoors, and continuing until the first frost.  A single plant will bear thousands upon thousands of tomatoes over a typical growing season and consequently, we've concluded that it is not possible to keep them picked, even with two children voraciously attacking them every day.  The small, half-inch-wide tomatoes burst with flavor when you pop them in your mouth, initially releasing an incredibly intense sweetness, later complemented by a very pleasing hint of acidity.  Besides being great for snacking, they are wonderful when added to pasta salads, mixed spring greens, or various other types of salads.  We also love them mixed with diced cucumbers, feta, and balsamic vinegar.  We simply can't say enough great things about this variety.  30-60 days from transplant.  50 seeds per packet.

HISTORY OF THE TEXAS TINY TOMATO:

I first received Texas Tiny as a bonus variety in a seed swap I did over a decade ago.  It came in a tiny plastic bag marked with a handwritten label and no description.  Since I was trialing a bunch of different dwarf varieties that year, I assumed that the "Tiny" was referring to the size of the plant, so later that spring, when a lady from the community--a lovely woman in her 80's-- asked if I had any spare plants that she could grow in a pot on her patio, I gave her one of my Texas Tiny plants to try.  As the summer went on, I watched my own Texas Tiny plants grow up through their cages, out the tops, back down and then across several rows of vegetables I had planted nearby.  I developed an image in my head of poor Holly being overtaken by her giant Texas Tiny plant.  I was almost embarrassed when I finally ran into her late that summer.  By no surprise, she quickly turned the conversation to "that tiny tomato."  "Did I do something wrong?", she asked, "The plant has taken over my patio."  "Hmm. I don't know," I replied.  "How much fertilizer did you put on?"  Finally, I broke out with a big smile and we both had a good laugh about the "tiny" tomato plant.  Despite its overbearing nature, word about "Texas Tiny" spread locally and so did the seeds, with several Texas Tiny ambassadors extolling the virtues of this tiny, but delicious tomato.  Although quite laborious to harvest the tremendous number of tomatoes required to produce an appreciable seed crop, at the request of gardeners, we finally gave in this year and began commercially offering seed for this unique variety.er.

Solanum lycopersicum

While the history of Texas Tiny remains elusive (see below), we couldn't have more good things to say about this tiny but mighty cherry tomato.  First of all, it is important to note that the "tiny" refers to the size of the tomatoes, not the plant, as we learned the hard way many years ago.  The plants themselves have a sprawling habit, reaching 15 feet or more if you don't prune them.  They are incredibly high yielding, initiating their first tomatoes... read more

read less

Solanum lycopersicum

While the history of Texas Tiny remains elusive (see below), we couldn't have more good things to say about this tiny but mighty cherry tomato.  First of all, it is important to note that the "tiny" refers to the size of the tomatoes, not the plant, as we learned the hard way many years ago.  The plants themselves have a sprawling habit, reaching 15 feet or more if you don't prune them.  They are incredibly high yielding, initiating their first tomatoes as seedlings, usually while still indoors, and continuing until the first frost.  A single plant will bear thousands upon thousands of tomatoes over a typical growing season and consequently, we've concluded that it is not possible to keep them picked, even with two children voraciously attacking them every day.  The small, half-inch-wide tomatoes burst with flavor when you pop them in your mouth, initially releasing an incredibly intense sweetness, later complemented by a very pleasing hint of acidity.  Besides being great for snacking, they are wonderful when added to pasta salads, mixed spring greens, or various other types of salads.  We also love them mixed with diced cucumbers, feta, and balsamic vinegar.  We simply can't say enough great things about this variety.  30-60 days from transplant.  50 seeds per packet.

HISTORY OF THE TEXAS TINY TOMATO:

I first received Texas Tiny as a bonus variety in a seed swap I did over a decade ago.  It came in a tiny plastic bag marked with a handwritten label and no description.  Since I was trialing a bunch of different dwarf varieties that year, I assumed that the "Tiny" was referring to the size of the plant, so later that spring, when a lady from the community--a lovely woman in her 80's-- asked if I had any spare plants that she could grow in a pot on her patio, I gave her one of my Texas Tiny plants to try.  As the summer went on, I watched my own Texas Tiny plants grow up through their cages, out the tops, back down and then across several rows of vegetables I had planted nearby.  I developed an image in my head of poor Holly being overtaken by her giant Texas Tiny plant.  I was almost embarrassed when I finally ran into her late that summer.  By no surprise, she quickly turned the conversation to "that tiny tomato."  "Did I do something wrong?", she asked, "The plant has taken over my patio."  "Hmm. I don't know," I replied.  "How much fertilizer did you put on?"  Finally, I broke out with a big smile and we both had a good laugh about the "tiny" tomato plant.  Despite its overbearing nature, word about "Texas Tiny" spread locally and so did the seeds, with several Texas Tiny ambassadors extolling the virtues of this tiny, but delicious tomato.  Although quite laborious to harvest the tremendous number of tomatoes required to produce an appreciable seed crop, at the request of gardeners, we finally gave in this year and began commercially offering seed for this unique variety.er.

Tomatoes
Heirloom Tomatoes

How to Grow Cherry Tomatoes

Tomatoes perform best in well-drained soil that contains plenty of organic matter and adequate phosphorous and calcium.  Ensure that the planting site receives at least 6 hours of daily sunlight.  Tomatoes require about two inches of water per week, otherwise fruit may become prone to developing blossom end rot.  Mulching plants with poly, paper, or natural materials will ensure consistent moisture throughout the root zone, especially during dry periods. 

For earliest harvest, start seeds indoors 6 weeks before the last frost.  Sow seeds 1/4" deep in well-moistened, sterile seed-starting mix.  The ideal temperature for tomato seed germination is 80 degrees.  For best results, place a growers heat mat beneath trays until germination has occurred.  Under ideal conditions, germination should occur in 7-10 days.  Water only as needed, as watering cools the soil and encourages fungal growth.

After danger of frost has passed, set transplants 30-36" apart in rows 48-60" apart.  To encourage strong roots, pinch off all but the top three leaves and bury the bottom two-thirds of the plant.  Ensure that plants receive 2" of water per week.  Avoid over-application of nitrogen as this can cause vegetative growth at the expense of fruit set.  Caging or staking plants is recommended.  While plants can be left to roam, providing support to plants will minimize soil-borne diseases.

Insect Pests

Biological controls such as Bacillus thuringiensis can be effective in controlling climbing cutworms and tomato hornworms.  Flea beetles, and other hard-shelled insects can be controlled with a simple homemade insecticidal soap solution.

Diseases & Other Problems

Contact your local university extension office to learn which tomato diseases are most prevalent in your area.  To prevent common tomato diseases like Septoria leaf spot, anthracnose, tomato wilt and blight, avoid watering plants at night or on cool, cloudy days.  Watering from below the canopy, mulching, and ensuring ample space between plants can also slow the spread of disease.  Finally, removing plant litter in the fall along with proper crop rotation and tillage will further limit the spread of disease.  Blossom end rot is a common issue caused by calcium deficiency and/or insufficient water intake.  Excess nitrogen and/or insufficient phosphorous can cause tomato plants to become bushy and produce few blossoms. 

For best flavor and texture, allow tomatoes to remain on the vine as long as possible.  If any fall before they have ripened, place them in a paper bag or wrap them in newspaper and set in a cool, dark place, stem side up, until fully ripened.  Tomatoes should not be refrigerated as it inhibits flavor-enhancing enzyme activity and contributes to an unpleasant, mealy texture.

CONSIDERATIONS:

Tomatoes are inbreeding plants with self-fertilization usually occurring before flowers have opened.  Therefore, measures to control cross pollination are usually not necessary.  Reports of out-crossing in tomatoes range from 0 to 5 percent, with substantially higher rates seen in potato-leaved cultivars.  Varieties with larger tomatoes are more prone to out-crossing because their large flowers are more open and the stigma may extend beyond the flower.  For this same reason, seeds should never be saved from double fruit of any variety.  Examine the stigma length of a particular variety to determine whether flowers will need to be bagged to prevent out-crossing.  If needed, inexpensive organza bags, like those used for wedding favors, can be placed over blossoms until nascent fruit appear. Bags should then be removed and the fruit tagged.

HARVESTING SEED:

To harvest seeds, cut fully ripened tomatoes in half and squeeze seeds and pulp into a container.  Cover with mesh and let sit until a layer of white fungus covers the surface (about 3-5 days.)  Fill container with cold water, stirring until seeds settle on the bottom.  Pour off water and pulp.  Repeat until seeds are clean.  Dry on a coffee filter.

SEED LONGETIVITY:

Tomato seeds will remain viable for up to 10 years when stored under ideal conditions.

Galina's Yellow Siberian Cherry Tomato

Customer Reviews

Based on 4 reviews
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T
Tiffany Lucas
100% germination!

Super happy with my germination rate with all 12 of the seeds I planted producing gorgeous little plants that are turning into gorgeous, huge plants with lots of blooms!

g
gary
The most fun of all the Tomatoes!

Extremely accurate description for these little gems. I sprouted WAY to many and ended up giving plants away to all my friends. If not 100% germination then 99%. These didn't take off like the other tomatoes (italian heirloom and Olpalkas), oh no, these guys played the long game. the plant wouldn't stop growing. The first blossom and the first tiny tomato showed up before I could get them in the ground...this should have been an omen.
We absolutely love these tomatoes. We are just amazed that more restaurants don't use them as a garnish or in main dishes.
We simply love everything about these. their size, their flavor, their abundance, their ease of maintenance. Absolutely one of my new favorite varieties.

My goodness, Gary. That pasta dish looks delicious! We're so glad you enjoyed growing Texas Tiny. It's one of our favorite varieties as well. Thank you so much for sharing your experience!

S
Sandra Alderfer
Looking forward to plants we never had before.

Good germination. Look good so far.

T
Tom Costa
great service and product

great service and product

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